Tag Archives: communication

The craft of innovation adoption is alive and well in Samsø…

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

I was reminded of this famous quote by anthropologist Margaret Mead last week, reading the story of how the Danish island of Samsø has gone renewable and become an energy exporter. The CleanTechnica article “Introducing Samsø, A 100% Wind-Powered Island” detailed not only WHAT had been done – it also gave some fascinating insight into the HOW.   Continue reading

Learned Helplessness: a recipe for sustainability INACTION?

Back in the 1960s, psychology researcher Martin Seligman and his team discovered how to create helplessness and passivity – first in animals and later in humans.  Some sustainability campaigners could learn an important lesson from his research about how to present their message so it generates action rather than helplessness. Continue reading

Myers-Briggs insights for sustainable business change agents…

During my early coach training, I learned about the Myers-Briggs  temperament preferences – it helped me understand some of my frustrations in the world and gave me some insights into how I could operate more effectively.  It was like the time I found out about the basics of perspective and proportion in drawing – there were actually tools that could help me to create a better result with less frustration. Continue reading

3 simple practices for success in the business sustainability game

Resilience Practices: Acceptance; Ambition; Curiosity & WonderGreenBiz.com recently released its 2013 State of the Profession report on the sustainability executive job market.  One of its findings was that there are key ways of being that support sustainability leadership success – particularly curiosity and an ambition to communicate effectively.

There is a trio of definable and practicable mindsets that support these ways of being. In the same way that Pilates builds core strength in our physical bodies, these practices build emotional resilience and are a strong foundation for career and life success.  The three practices are acceptance, ambition and curiosity/wonder. Continue reading

A conversational approach to innovation adoption…

So you’ve got a great idea, and you’ve come up with a proposal that will meet the needs of the people you want to use it. Your work here is done… isn’t it?

Well, no – it’s not a done deal until you have your invention turned into an adopted practice – that’s the real work of innovation. Your proposed change requires a community of people who do things in a particular way to change how they work together – and there’s a process to this. Continue reading

Blue wrens on Bourke Street?

(adapted from the August Balance3 Update)

Sitting in Kinfolk community cafe talking about Regenerative Business recently with a Melbourne Hubber, we got to the topic of creating positive visions. What would a regenerative City of Melbourne look like?   How would we know a deep and significant shift had occurred?  What small, tangible thing would we be seeing differently?

Maybe a truly regenerative Melbourne would be so connected to its original environment that we would see blue wrens in Bourke Street? (A major thoroughfare in Melbourne’s central business district.)

We weren’t talking about a transplant or a breeding program – we were talking about what it would be like to have the city so connected to its original ecosystem that it would naturally provide habitat that would enable these beautiful little birds to thrive (along with other original species). [ See one here ]

Imagine That!!!

We played the “I wonder” game – I wonder what would it take? I wonder who would be involved? I wonder how we could make it socially and financially sustainable? Because when you get right down to it, we wouldn’t be trying to do anything technically impossible… Hmmmm! Continue reading

Creating clarity on a sustainable future

In an earlier post “Conversational practices for smart sustainability professionals” we outlined four types of conversations that contribute to effective communication and collaboration.

The most overlooked type of conversation is a conversation for clarity, where we articulate and test our understanding of a situation; explore the understandings of others; and develop a shared understanding.  Conversations for clarity  eliminate misunderstandings, build trust and allow progress to flow. Continue reading