Category Archives: Regenerative Business Examples

Set your internal program guide to the positive

Adapted from “Set your internal program guide to the positive…” in September’s issue of Regenerative Thinking in Action.

Recent research into how our brains work is increasingly proving we see what we’re looking for. The continuing story of InterfaceFLOR’s sustainability journey is a great positive to tune in to, as told in their recent update on how they’re building community wealth in the Pacific by turning old fishing net into new carpet tiles.

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Sustainia’s top 100 for 2014 makes interesting reading

Top 100 report 2014

Top 100 report 2014

It’s a chilly winter’s afternoon in my home town down under, and I’m catching up on my reading list.  The Sustainia Top 100 came out last month and it’s an inspiring way to spend some time.  It’s the third annual report on the practical, happening, fundamental shifts underway in how our products and services are being delivered. Continue reading

The craft of innovation adoption is alive and well in Samsø…

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

I was reminded of this famous quote by anthropologist Margaret Mead last week, reading the story of how the Danish island of Samsø has gone renewable and become an energy exporter. The CleanTechnica article “Introducing Samsø, A 100% Wind-Powered Island” detailed not only WHAT had been done – it also gave some fascinating insight into the HOW.   Continue reading

Do you have evidence of regenerative thinking being put into practice?

To me, the Regenerative Business revolution began back in the 1990s.  Where I see examples, I post them into the LinkedIn Regenerative Business discussion group.

To me, the more we observe and applaud the emerging shift to truly win/win/win sustainable business models, the more we can accelerate their spread.  Whether it’s a suburban accountant installing a master power-off switch in a building refurbishment or a plastics manufacturer turning post-consumer waste into quality packaging, there’s a lot going on.

So now it’s your turn – what shifts are you observing towards business models where:

  • there are no products  – only valuable services
  • there are no wastes – only valuable by-products
  • products are designed for total safety
  • products are designed for re-manufacture as products-of-service
  • products are designed to copy nature’s smart thinking – renewable materials, renewable energy, room-temperature processes
  • resource usage is radically reduced
  • small, smart local solutions are replacing big infrastructure/big waste solutions

Share them as a comment here, in the LinkedIn Regenerative Business group, or through the Balance3 Contact page.

 

 

This tiny house uses mushrooms as insulation

Fascinating example of leveraging nature (biomimicry)

Grist

Usually you do not want fungi in the walls of your home. But Ecovative is building a home in which having fungi in the walls is the entire point. The “Mushroom Tiny House” will use mycelium (the mass of threadlike “roots” that mushrooms use to take in nutrition) for insulation.

According to Inhabitat, this stuff is basically asbestos except that it’s not bad for the planet, won’t give you cancer, and is related to something you might put on a pizza:

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O’Hare Opens the World’s First Farmer’s Market in an Airport, Fed by a Future Growing® Vertical Farm

An interesting ‘small, local, smart solution’ – maybe one of the world’s shortest commercial supply chains?

Future Growing LLC

On a recent business trip to the Northeast US, I booked a flight that would allow me a long layover at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.

Even though most business travelers run from a layover, I had an ulterior motive.

I wanted to visit the airport’s flagship vertical aeroponic Future Growing® O’Hare urban garden — the world’s first food farm inside an airport terminal. The great thing about visiting this airport farm is that you don’t need a rental car or a hotel room, and you don’t have to go through security again. The farm is centrally located right in the airport at the mezzanine level of Terminal 3, near the entrance to Concourse G.
Even though I had visited the ground-breaking farm that provides chemical-free herbs and vegetables to airport restaurants several times before, I like to stop in from time to time and meet with our farmers personally.

On my…

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Cacti can clean up poisonous soils

Regenerative Thinking in Practice.

Principle #5 – Leverage Nature’s Solutions

Nature has spent millions of years working out how to do things  with renewable materials at room temperature – let’s make the most of those answers.

More on Biomimicry and Industrial Design at:

http://www.biomimicryinstitute.org/case-studies/case-studies/industrial-design.html

Grist

Here are a few things you do with a prickly pear cactus: Get poked. Turn its fruit into jam. Use it to clean up dangerous concentrations of selenium in arid California lands.

In California’s San Joaquin Valley, a long history of artificial irrigation has impregnated the soil with selenium. In small quantities, selenium is beneficial to humans and animals — essential, even. In larger quantities, it’s toxic.

Prickly pear cacti, though, can thrive in these soils, even though irrigation has also made the soil and water dangerously salty.

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